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V Category Fonts

 Voltage

Voltage, created by award-winning typeface and lettering designer Laura Worthington, is an unexpected and energetic standout in the world of script fonts, breaking free from formal classifications while retaining the degree of personality we treasure in hand lettering. Her primary goal was unique: readability with personality. Gone are the large loops, the frilliness, and the choice of beauty and elegance over utility. More…

Voltage takes the script font in a different direction, with an emphasis on practicality and uniformity, and with the reader’s needs at the forefront—this is a straightforward, muscular lettering font, assertive, yet down-to-earth. The beauty is found in its elegantly-wrought construction, its versatility, its references to a different era, and in the galvanizing swashes and alternates available not only in a professional designer’s software, but to everyone with a computer.

It is not based on naturally-occurring handwriting; it’s clearly a structured lettering form based on balance, a solid rhythm, and uniformity. Script fonts often are quirky. In contrast, this is a workhorse, almost a text version of a script font. Voltage is ideal for headlines, logos, subheads, short sentences, phrases, a short paragraph, and pull quotes. The default setting (without swashes and alternates) is best for phrases and subheads.

Like many of Worthington’s typefaces, Voltage is evocative of a milieu or era. Here, we see the metal lettering on automobiles of the past—with their retro takes on a bright future–and those emblems of an optimistic, hardworking period. Its overall regularity references a time when the machine was king—the late days of the Industrial Age. Imagine vintage instructions on signs or paper; they may be created by machinery or by hand, yet both have that industrial sensibility. We sense visions in the 1950s—and earlier—of what the Nuclear Age would look like. Voltage calls to mind gas stations, machinists, receipts at machine shops, trips to the soda fountain at the drugstore, shopping at the five and dime. Yet, in its twists and small irregularities, we see vestiges of hand-painted signage, the rivets in beloved, old, worn blue jeans, the touch of the ”common man” who, alongside women, built America.

Voltage is versatile. Like those old jeans, the look depends on how and where you use it. You can dress up a good pair of jeans by choosing high heels; you can dress down with sturdy work boots. Because Worthington assigned unicode values to the swashes and alternates, anyone can use their operating system’s Character Map to access them. The options become endless. It can have the spirit of a picnic—casual, fun, and friendly, yet, in other contexts, convey tough mountain-biking. So, use this font for small areas of text and it makes a statement without overpowering the main body text. Or, dig into Voltage swashes and alternates for much larger titles to capture the attention of the reader and create a dramatic presence, such as using the powerful lightning bolt swash that shoots out from the descender of the lowercase g. Electrifying!

The challenge, as Worthington worked on Voltage, was noting that script fonts are almost always notoriously difficult to read. How could she strive for clarity, readability, and uniformity, yet retain the vivid personality that Voltage (and its designers and readers) deserve? She used a tall x-height, minimal detailing in the lowercase ascenders and descenders, worked on low contrast, and amped it up to make it heavier and add substance. It comes in 3 weights—light, regular, and bold—and even the regular weight is as substantial as many bolds in other fonts. In fact, it is one of the few script fonts that you can use with confidence at a relatively small size (e.g., 18 pt) in a short paragraph. No one letter dominates the others. Stems have a weighty base but have light strokes in many letters for clarity and distinctiveness. The looped descenders of the lowercase g and other letters use a thin stroke that curves and thickens as it rises up to meet the next letter, making the loop lighter and therefore more legible than a large uniform loop.

This most magnetic typeface provides 154 unique swash designs (that yield a total of 348 swash variations), 39 alternates, and 15 ligatures.

 Vtg Stencil UK No 76™

The Vtg Stencil series of fonts from astype are based on real world stencils. The UK No. 76 design was derived from authentic stencil plates from Great Britain.

UK No. 76 come in two flavours – the Regular style and the Alt style with alternate and shorter forms of the letters M, W and the figure eight.

 Via Sans

Via sans is a font inspired by classics like Steile Futura and Din 1451, with neo-humanist characteristics. It was designed as a font for fast reading from a distance, which saves horizontal space in the text composition, making it a very good alternative when composing long phrases in reduced spaces, with high readability in various sizes due to its ample counters. With round corners that reduce the irradiation that reflective materials in signs produce.

This family is composed by 8 fonts, 4 weight variations and 4 inclination variations, which include European accents marks, ligatures, fractions, ordinals and tabular numbers, in addition to a pictogram set that complement applications for wayfinding and maps.

 Vindemiam

Set of vintage ornaments that are easily combined in a rapport (pattern) compositions or elegant frames.

 Vage™

Vage™ is a family of 10 fonts, a contemporary sans-serif typeface. It is rooted in the style of a classic high contest typeface provides advanced typographical support with features such as ligatures and alternate characters. Especially suited for fashion magazines, logotypes and luxury contexts.

 Vexilla

Inspired by ancient carved writings, Vexilla is born from the XXXIV Chant of the Dante’s Inferno. A full-caps typeface suitable for various projects, display lettering and posters.

 Vertebrata™

Vertebrata is a serif type family of six fonts, designed by Fulvio Bisca between 2011 and 2014. It embodies features from different ages of writing and history of typography: the solemnity of Capitalis Monumentalis in uppercase and small caps, rhythm of Textura in lowercase, sturdiness of 1800 Slab Serifs in the overall look and feel, and a contemporary modular approach to the construction process. In spite of the geometric genesis of the letterforms, special attention has been paid to optical corrections, in order to obtain a natural and legible design. More…

With more than 500 glyphs per font and carefully designed small capitals, Vertebrata is a complete OpenType family, including multilingual and advanced typographic features. Regular, Italic, Bold and Bold Italic styles are intended for both text and display applications, whereas Black and Black Italic are more suitable for display size settings.

 Vtg Stencil Germany No101™

The Vtg Stencil font series by astype is based on real world stencils.
Vtg Stencil Germany No. 101 is modeled after historic stencil plates from Bavaria.

The design is a blackletter chancery, a romantic reprise of a style that was common in German writing offices from the 14th to the 16th century. The flourishes stylistically quote the Baroque period. A talented mind, perhaps around 1890, has transformed the textura shapes into a modular stencil system. Many elements are repeated throughout the glyph set – see for example the initial swashes on the letters A, B, U etc. More…

Overall, this decorative blackletter doesn’t look like a stencil design.
Maybe it was originally used by a sign painter, and all the typical stencil bridges would have been painted over in the final work.

If you’re looking for a decorative blackletter font with a unique touch and a romantic feel, you will love Germany No. 101.

 Velvet Hammer

The Velvet Hammer is a true hand calligraphy font that offers the viewer a sense of strong elegance. This font can be used for all things such as cards, posters, signage, wedding invitations, catalogs, book covers and so much more! The Velvet Hammer’s simple unique style can stand strong on its own or sit comfortably side by side with any display or text font!

 Vullkan NF

Live long and prosper. Barnhart Brothers and Spindler. 1884. Originally named Vulcan. Enough said. Both versions support the Latin 1252, Central European 1250, Turkish 1254 and Baltic 1257 codepages.

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