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Lancelot Pro Font Download

font family from Canada Type, added today

Lancelot Pro

When type historians look back on Jim Rimmer, they will consider him the last type designer who just couldn't let go of metal type, even though he was just as proficient in digital type. Lancelot is one definite case in point: A face designed and produced in digital as late in the game as 1999, only to spring onto the new millenium a couple of years later as a metal type cast in three sizes. That was Jim, a time traveler constantly reminding the craft of its origins.

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Aragon ST Font Download

font family from Canada Type, added today

Aragon ST

Aragon ST is a special version of Hans van Maanen’s Aragon family. It was developed for science writing, and it serves as the very first introduction of SciType, an innovative new way of building fonts specifically for typesetting science text. For more information about SciType, please consult the SciType FAQ PDF in the Gallery section.

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Loxley™ Font Download

font family from Canada Type, added today

Loxley™

Drawn shortly before Jim Rimmer’s passing in 2010, Loxley was designed to be used in a fine press edition of the folklore story of Robin Hood. It was named after the cited birthplace of the story’s classic hero.

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Isabelle Pro™ Font Download

font family from Canada Type, added today

Isabelle Pro™

Isabelle is the closest thing to a metal type revival Jim Rimmer ever did. The original metal face was designed and cut in late 1930s Germany, but its propspects were cut short by the arrival of the war. This was one of Jim’s favourite faces, most likely because of the refined art deco elements that reminded him of his youthful enthusiasm about everything press-related, and the face’s intricately thought balance between calligraphy and typography. Not to mention one of the most beautiful italics ever made.

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Albertan Pro™ Font Download

font family from Canada Type, added today

Albertan Pro™

Albertan was the first Jim Rimmer typeface to make the transition from metal to digital. And for very good reason. When the first roman face was cut at 16 pt. in 1982, it was intended for use in hand-setting limited edition books at Jim’s own Pie Tree Press, but it immediately perked the ears of text typography connoisseurs in the printing industry. It was hard to resist Jim’s expertly balanced approach at transforming the traditional roman model by infusing many transitional traits into the forms without sacrificing the integrity of the calligraphic influence or the functionality of the overall setting. Not to mention only Jim Rimmer could have made those almost-slab serifs work in such a face. A first post-Baskerville-post-Joanna, if you will.

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